How Does Scoring Work in Cricket? A Beginner’s Guide

Cricket is a popular sport played and enjoyed all over the world. While the objective of the game is to score as many runs as possible, the scoring system in cricket can be confusing for beginners. In this article, we will break down the basics of how scoring works in cricket, including runs, boundaries, wickets, and dismissals.

Runs and Boundaries

In cricket, runs are scored when the batsmen hit the ball and run between the wickets. A boundary is scored when the ball reaches the boundary line of the field. There are four types of boundaries in cricket:

  • Four: When the ball crosses the boundary after touching the ground.
  • Six: When the ball clears the boundary without touching the ground.
  • Overthrow: When the fielder throws the ball past the wicket-keeper, and the batsmen score extra runs.
  • Bye: When the ball misses the bat and the wicket-keeper, and the batsmen score extra runs.

Wickets and Dismissals

In cricket, there are two sets of wickets, each consisting of three wooden stumps and two bails placed on top. The objective of the bowler is to hit the wickets and dismiss the batsman. There are several ways a batsman can be dismissed in cricket:

  • Bowled: When the ball hits the stumps and dislodges the bails.
  • Caught: When a fielder catches the ball hit by the batsman before it touches the ground.
  • Run Out: When the fielder hits the stumps with the ball while the batsman is running between the wickets.
  • Stumped: When the wicket-keeper removes the bails while the batsman is out of the crease.
  • LBW (Leg Before Wicket): When the ball hits the batsman’s leg instead of the bat and would have hit the stumps if the leg was not there.

Extras

In cricket, there are several ways in which the bowling team can concede extra runs to the batting team. These include:

  • No Ball: When the bowler oversteps the crease, throws the ball above the waist height, or bowls a full-toss above the waist height.
  • Wide: When the ball is bowled too far away from the batsman.
  • Bye: When the ball misses the bat and the wicket-keeper, and the batsmen score extra runs.
  • Leg Bye: When the ball hits the batsman’s leg and the batsmen score extra runs.

Scoring in Different Formats of Cricket

The scoring system in cricket varies depending on the format of the game. In Test cricket, teams bat for two innings, and the team with the most runs after both innings wins. In One Day Internationals (ODIs), each team gets 50 overs to bat, and the team with the most runs at the end of the game wins. In Twenty20 (T20) cricket, each team gets 20 overs to bat, and the team with the most runs at the end of the game wins.

Conclusion

Scoring in cricket may seem complicated at first, but with practice and patience, it can be easily understood. Knowing the basics of how runs, boundaries, wickets, and dismissals work can help you enjoy the game more and

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